Housing

    Results: 13

  • Community Shelters (2)
    BH-1800.8500-150

    Community Shelters

    BH-1800.8500-150

    Programs, usually sponsored by community organizations or coalitions, that provide temporary shelter for homeless people, generally in dormitory-style facilities with very little privacy. Most community shelters offer support services which may include counseling, advocacy, referrals and help with future plans; and enforce house rules including curfews and mandatory household chores. Participation in religious activities is either optional or not a part of the program. There may be differences in intake, length of stay and amenities in family oriented facilities and those that target other specific populations.
  • Domestic Violence Shelters (4)
    BH-1800.1500-100

    Domestic Violence Shelters

    BH-1800.1500-100

    Programs that provide temporary emergency shelter for women who have experienced domestic violence/abuse, and for their children. Such facilities usually provide in-house individual, group and family counseling and the full range of secondary services related to domestic violence including referral to appropriate resources. Also included are similar facilities for battered men and those that can accommodate both men and women.
  • Group Homes for Dependent Children (1)
    PH-6300.2500

    Group Homes for Dependent Children

    PH-6300.2500

    Facilities that provide an alternative living environment for children and youth who have been neglected, abused or abandoned or have had contact with the juvenile justice system, who are unable to live with their own family or a foster family and who would benefit from a professionally supervised, structured group environment. In some situations, particularly with older youth, a group home is the only option available. Group homes for dependent children are generally licensed by the state.
  • Homeless Financial Assistance Programs (1)
    NL-1000.3000

    Homeless Financial Assistance Programs

    NL-1000.3000

    Programs authorized under federal or state legislation or local government initiatives that provide financial assistance for the express purpose of obtaining temporary shelter, emergency housing or permanent housing for individuals and/or families who are homeless or imminently homeless. Expenses may include rental deposits, rent assistance, utility deposits, moving expenses, expenses associated with non-shelter temporary housing in situations where permanent housing has been secured but is currently unavailable, and other costs the family may incur in the process of acquiring or maintaining housing. Allowable activities, eligibility criteria and other requirements vary depending on the funding source.
  • Housing Counseling (4)
    BH-3700

    Housing Counseling

    BH-3700

    Programs that provide comprehensive assistance for people who want to rent or purchase housing including information and guidance about buying and rental costs; how to select affordable housing that meets individual needs; and how to provide for insurance, maintenance and other requirements related to acquiring and paying for housing.
  • Landlord/Tenant Dispute Resolution (3)
    FT-4500.4600

    Landlord/Tenant Dispute Resolution

    FT-4500.4600

    Programs that help tenants and landlords resolve disputes regarding security and other rental deposits, unsanitary conditions, failure to make repairs, privacy, notice requirements, excessive rent increases, nonpayment of rent, neglect or damage to property, overcrowding or other grievances.
  • Low Income/Subsidized Private Rental Housing (6)
    BH-7000.4600-450

    Low Income/Subsidized Private Rental Housing

    BH-7000.4600-450

    Privately owned rental housing that is made available to low-income individuals and families at reduced rates based on a contract between HUD or the state housing authority and the property owner. Subsidies are paid directly to the owner of the property who then rents units to income-eligible individuals and families. Also included are low-cost or below market rate housing that is operated or sponsored by religious or charitable organizations for the benefit of low-income individuals and families; and rental housing targeted to lower income households that has been purchased, rehabilitated or constructed by developers who are receiving a federal income tax credit under the Low Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC) program or are participants in other similar affordable housing incentive programs. Some privately owned rental units that were developed or improved with public funds are also required to rent a designated number of units at reduced prices to people who meet low-income eligibility requirements until the federal or state loans are paid. Some complexes or housing units may be reserved for low-income older adults, people with disabilities and/or other special populations. Included are income-based rental housing where tenants pay rent that is geared to their income; as well as fixed below market rate rental housing where rent is lower than what people would normally pay renting the unit but is based on a specified percentage of the median income for the area rather than on a percentage of an individual's actual income, and tenants may have to be within a specified income range to live there. Rental amounts and the level of "affordability" may vary considerably among programs.
  • Rent Payment Assistance (1)
    BH-3800.7000

    Rent Payment Assistance

    BH-3800.7000

    Programs that make rental payments for people who are at risk of eviction without assistance. Rent payment assistance programs may have age, income, disability, need or other eligibility requirements.
  • Runaway/Youth Shelters (1)
    BH-1800.1500-700

    Runaway/Youth Shelters

    BH-1800.1500-700

    Programs that provide temporary emergency shelter for children and youth who have run away from or have been pushed out of their homes or who are acting out and at risk for abuse pending return to their own families or suitable alternative placement. Such facilities usually provide in-house individual, group and family counseling and the full range of other secondary services related to runaways including referral to appropriate resources.
  • Section 8/Rental Assistance Program Rental Listings (5)
    BH-3900.3050-750

    Section 8/Rental Assistance Program Rental Listings

    BH-3900.3050-750

    Programs that maintain lists of available rental housing that is owned or managed by individuals who have agreed to accept tenants who have Section 8 certificates from the local housing authority or finance agency, or rental assistance certificates from other federal, state or locally funded rental assistance programs.
  • Supervised Living for Older Youth (1)
    PH-6300.8000

    Supervised Living for Older Youth

    PH-6300.8000

    Programs that help older children in foster care, emancipated youth who are no longer eligible for foster care and/or other youth, usually to age 21, establish residence in private homes, apartments, boarding homes, college dormitories or other residential settings and provide supervision and support while they develop independent living skills.
  • Tenant Rights Information/Counseling (2)
    FT-4500.8550

    Tenant Rights Information/Counseling

    FT-4500.8550

    Programs that provide information and guidance for tenants who need to know their rights and responsibilities regarding leases and rental agreements, deposits, legal eviction procedures, measures to protect themselves from unlawful or retaliatory evictions, rent withholding rights, rent control requirements, privacy rights and other issues that may be of particular interest to tenants. Tenant rights counseling may also include assistance in completing forms, advice regarding a particular dispute and contact with the offending landlord to provide notification that she or he is not in compliance with landlord/tenant laws.
  • Transitional Housing/Shelter (7)
    BH-8600

    Transitional Housing/Shelter

    BH-8600

    Programs that provide extended shelter and supportive services primarily for homeless individuals and/or families with the goal of helping them live independently and transition into permanent housing. Some programs require that the individual/family be transitioning from a short-term emergency shelter. The length of stay varies considerably by program. It is generally longer than two weeks but typically 60 days or more and, in many cases, up to two years or more. The supportive services may be provided directly by the organization managing the housing or may be coordinated by them and provided by other public or private agencies. Transitional housing/shelter is generally provided in apartment style facilities with a higher degree of privacy than short-term homeless shelters; may be provided at no cost to the resident; and may be configured for specialized groups within the homeless population such as people with substance abuse problems, homeless mentally ill, homeless domestic violence victims, veterans or homeless people with AIDS/HIV. In some cases, a "transition in place" option allows families to continue living in the same complex (if not the same unit) where their transitional housing unit is located when they are ready to move to permanent housing. In other cases, the permanent housing option is either public housing or private rental housing supported by a tenant-based voucher subsidy. Included are post-domestic violence shelter housing programs that make affordable rental housing (or other accommodations) available to women, generally those who are coming directly out of a domestic violence shelter or other crisis shelter, often in apartment complexes owned by the shelter; and programs that provide transitional housing and support services for other targeted groups such as military and veteran families and others who need a temporary supportive living environment to maintain stability and begin to thrive.
 
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